Archive for March, 2011

The Benefits to Free-Range Eggs

Eggs from pastured hens are far richer in vitamin D

Eggs from hens raised outdoors on pasture have from three to six times more chickensvitamin D than eggs from hens raised in confinement. Pastured hens are exposed to direct sunlight, which their bodies convert to vitamin D and then pass on to the eggs.

Vitamin D is best known for its role in building strong bones. New research shows that it can also enhance the immune system, improve mood, reduce blood pressure, combat cancer, and reduce the risk of some autoimmune disorders.

This latest good news about eggs comes from a study just released by Mother Earth News, a magazine that plays a leading role in promoting health-enhancing, natural foods. The editors found that eating just two eggs will give you from 63-126% of the recommended daily intake of vitamin D.

Note that this benefit comes only from hens that are free to graze fresh greens, eat bugs, and bask in the sun. Most of the eggs sold in the supermarket do not meet this criterion. Even though the label says that the eggs are “certified organic” or come from “uncaged” or “free-range” hens or from hens fed an “all-vegetarian” diet, this is no guarantee that the hens had access to the outdoors or pasture.

The eggs that we are providing through Thrive Foods are Free-Range.  If you notice that the eggs are various sizes, it is due to the chickens just getting started and the colder weather.  Getting local free range eggs is worth every bit.  If you would like to order these eggs, we will make them available for pick up every Thrive week.  Just notify us how many dozen eggs you want and pre-pay for them.  The following pick up date we will have them available for you.

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Make a Healthier Hamburger

OK.  For you who enjoy beef and like a good burger from time to time, I found a story that you might enjoy on how you might make that burger healthier. Below is the story “Make a Healthier Hamburger” by Donna V. Scaglione of NewsmaxHealth.com

High-in-fat hamburgers have a well-deserved bad reputation. Red meat has been linked to heart disease, obesity, and some cancers. But it also is high in iron and protein, which the body needs for rich blood and healthy bones and muscle.

You can have your hamburger and eat it, too. Just make sure the meat you choose is lean and that you don’t over-grill it. Here are more ways to build a better burger.

Read more:Make a Healthier Hamburger

If you are wanting to know how you could order a very lean beef, we have built a relationship with Plum Rich Beef of Edmond.  Their ground beef is a very high quality completely grass fed Long Horn beef.  I also posted 10 reasons why grass-fed beef is better:

Score Ten for Grass-Fed Beef

Grass-fed beef is better for human health than grain-fed beef in ten different ways, according to the most comprehensive analysis to date. The 2009 study was a joint effort between the USDA and researchers at Clemson University in South Carolina. Compared with grain-fed beef, grass-fed beef was:

  1. Lower in total fat
  2. Higher in beta-carotene
  3. Higher in vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol)
  4. Higher in the B-vitamins thiamin and riboflavin
  5. Higher in the minerals calcium, magnesium, and potassium
  6. Higher in total omega-3s
  7. A healthier ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids (1.65 vs 4.84)
  8. Higher in CLA (cis-9 trans-11), a potential cancer fighter
  9. Higher in vaccenic acid (which can be transformed into CLA)
  10. Lower in the saturated fats linked with heart disease

S.K. Duckett et al, Journal of Animal Science, (published online) June 2009, “Effects of winter stocker growth rate and finishing system on: III. Tissue proximate, fatty acid, vitamin and cholesterol content.

 

 

Food Matters Documentary

The focus of the film is in helping us rethink the belief systems fed to us by our modern medical and health care establishments. The interviewees point out that not every problem requires costly, major medical attention and reveal many alternative therapies that can be more effective, more economical, less harmful and less invasive than conventional medical treatments.

If you want to watch the trailer or learn about the documentary go to http://www.foodmatters.tv/.  You may be able to find it online through Netflix as well.  Hope you enjoy watching it and if you want to share your thoughts or any feedback, feel free to share.

Fruit Boxes: March 24, 2011

Small Fruit Box

  • Berries,  Blueberries – 1 pkg
  • Berries, Strawberries – 1 pkg
  • Lemons – ½ lb
  • Mandarins – 1.5 lbs
  • Pineapple – 1 ct

Large Fruit Box

  • Avocado – 2 ct
  • Berries, Strawberries – 2 pkg
  • Berries, Blueberries – 1 pkg
  • Lemons – 1 lb
  • Mandarins – 2.5 lbs
  • Mango – 3 ct

 

Today’s Variety Boxes: March 24, 2011

Small Box

  • Asparagus – ½ bunch
  • Carrots – ½ lb
  • Kale – ½ bunch
  • Mushrooms – 3 oz
  • Spinach, loose – 4 oz
  • Onion, Red – 8 oz
  • Tomatoes, Roma- 8 oz
  • Yams, Garnet – 1.5 lbs
  • Apples, Braeburn – ½ bag
  • Avocadoes – 1 ct
  • Bananas, Grn/Ylw – 1.5 lbs
  • Berries, Strawberries – 1 lb
  • Grapefruit – 1 ct
  • Oranges, Navel – 3 ct

Medium Box

  • Asparagus – 1 bunch
  • Carrots – 1 lb
  • Kale – 1 bunch
  • Mushrooms – 5 oz
  • Salad, mixed – 8 oz
  • Spinach, loose – 8 oz
  • Onion, Red – 1 lb
  • Tomatoes, Roma – 1 lb
  • Yams, Garnet – 3 lbs
  • Apples, Braeburn – 1 bag
  • Avocadoes – 2 ct
  • Bananas, Grn/Ylw – 3.25 lbs
  • Berries, Strawberries – 1 lb
  • Grapefruit – 3 ct
  • Oranges, Navel – 6 ct

Large Box

  • Asparagus – 1.5 bunch
  • Carrots – 1.5 lb
  • Kale – 1.5 bunch
  • Mushrooms – 8 oz
  • Salad, mixed – 8 oz
  • Spinach, loose – 12 oz
  • Onion, Red – 1.5 lb
  • Tomatoes, Roma – 1.5 lb
  • Yams, Garnet – 4.5 lbs
  • Apples, Braeburn – 1.5 bag
  • Avocadoes – 3 ct
  • Bananas, Grn/Ylw – 4.75 lbs
  • Berries, Strawberries – 2 lb
  • Grapefruit – 4 ct
  • Oranges, Navel – 9 ct

Extra Large Box

  • Asparagus – 2 bunches
  • Carrots – 2 lbs
  • Kale – 2 bunches
  • Mushrooms – 10 oz
  • Salad, mixed – 16 oz
  • Spinach, loose – 16 oz
  • Onion, Red – 2 lbs
  • Tomatoes, Roma – 2 lbs
  • Yams, Garnet – 6 lbs
  • Apples, Braeburn – 2 bags
  • Avocadoes – 4 ct
  • Bananas, Grn/Ylw – 36.5 lbs
  • Berries, Strawberries – 2 lbs
  • Grapefruit – 6 ct
  • Oranges, Navel – 12 ct

 

This Week is Thrive Week!!!

Friendly Reminder:

This coming Thursday, March 24, is a Thrive Week.  There are two locations and times:

Details (Acts 2 Church Pick Up):

Where:  Acts 2 Church in Edmond at 4848 West Covell Road (click here for map)
What:  A second location for those who live in that area and/or belong to that church community
When:  Every other Thursday @ 4:00pm — 5:30pm
Who:  Anyone from the Acts 2 Church and the surrounding community
Details (Downtown Pick Up):
Where:  The Refuge OKC at 823 W. California Ave, Oklahoma City (click here for map)
What:  The primary location/hub
When:  Every other Thursday @ 4:00pm — 6:00pm
Who:  Anyone who prefers the downtown location

Food Prices Seem to Be Going Up

Wholesale costs in the U.S. rose more than forecast in February, led by food prices at a more than three-decade high and a surge in energy.

The producer-price index climbed 1.6 percent from the prior month, the most since June 2009, Labor Department figures showed today in Washington. The median projection in a Bloomberg News survey was for a 0.7 percent gain. The so-called core measure, which excludes volatile food and energy costs increased 0.2 percent, matching forecasts.

The cost of food increased 3.9 percent, the most since November 1974, while energy prices rose 3.3 percent led by a 15 percent jump in home heating oil.

Read more: Inflation Pressure Soars on Biggest Food-Price Spike in 36 Years

How this may impact you:

  • the short run impact would be that you may see the quantity amount in your variety boxes go down so if you need to add a fruit share or increase your box size, feel free.
  • it could be that together we look for smarter ways to help each other find health food supplies
  • in the long run, we look to create and resource more local gardening/farming.  this spring, we will be meeting with, purchasing from local farmers as food starts growing.
  • if you have any ideas, please feel free to share with each other